164 

 

treatment plants is either purchased by Ostara or used in a retail fertilizer product developed by Clean 
Water Services called Clean Water Grow.  

Clean Water Services uses an aluminum sulfate solution (alum) to treat wastewater at its Rock Creek 
and Durham treatment facilities.  The implementation and refinement of biological phosphorous 
removal has contributed to a dramatic reduction in alum use at these facilities leading to lower costs 
and a smaller environmental footprint.  

Clean Water Services developed a process called WASSTRIP (Waste Activated Sludge Stripping to 
Remove Internal Phosphorous) that reduces struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate) buildup in the 
operation of anaerobic nutrient removal facilities. WASSTRIP technology saves wastewater treatment 
plants hundreds of thousands of dollars a year in maintenance and longer facility lives. CWS, through its 
non-profit partner the Clean Water Institute, signed a licensing agreement with Ostara Nutrient 
Technologies Inc. that provides the company an exclusive right to sell this technology in major markets 
around the world.  

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Performance Measures & Results 

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Tons of Crystal Green Produced - 318 (2013), 459 (2014), 464 (2015) 

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Stores carrying Clean Water Grow -  5 (2013), 12 (2014), 25 (2015), 32 (2016)  

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WASSTRIP Installations -  5 by 2016      

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WATERSHED STEWARDSHIP  

 

Unified vision statement established that integrates water supply, water conservation, water 
recycling, runoff management, wastewater facilities planning, and infrastructure planning using 
a regional watershed approach.   

 

Green infrastructure deployment to enhance infiltration, evapotranspiration, treatment, or 
capture and reuse of stormwater  

 

Watershed permitting strategy for multiple facilities (e.g., active nutrient water quality trading 
under a watershed-based permit)  

 

Ecosystem enhancements for improved hydraulics or water quality, including:  

o

 

Riparian reforestation to enhance pollution mitigation functions 

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Stream channel restoration for increased hydrologic stability   

o

 

Critical land acquisitions (e.g., conservation easements, buffer-zone purchases)   

 

Climate impact resilience principles incorporated into planning for new, repair, and replacement 
of infrastructure.   
 

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Collective Impact Model between aligns diverse groups of partnerships and individuals around 
ecological enhancement/restoration strategies within stream corridors, linking local actions into 
a cohesive network, (i.e. Tree for All) to address large and complex environmental challenges, 
(i.e. thermal load reduction, resilient stream corridors, hydro-modification, urban development) 
at the watershed scale.  

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Beaver Activity Management Strategy for restoration planning embraces the ecological benefits 
of beaver activity.  The North American Beaver (Castor Canadensis) is a keystone species in the 
Pacific Northwest Ecosystem and beaver dams provide substantial benefits to watershed health, 
including: increased channel complexity, filtering and settling of sediments, increased