435 

 

volunteer hours to local schools and nonprofits. In addition, we have started including 
community benefits in alternative delivery contracts, the first of which leverages over $4.5 
million.  One Water Approach  

Another unique aspect of our agency is that we are a water, power and sewer utility, which brings its 
challenges, but also presents opportunities for alignment. As we test new approaches for conservation 
and reuse, we need to consider the implications for the other aspects of our system.  

Our systems are interconnected and we are working to embody a “one water” system that considers all 
sources of water within the urban water cycle as a potential resource, implementing the latest 
technologies in water treatment, and applying the right water to the right use.   

Our goal is to provide a more resilient water supply in the face of climate uncertainties and potential 
disruptions such as earthquakes, and create synergistic projects that provide multiple benefits.   

Internal Workforce Development  

Lastly, an area in which we have excelled is in strengthening our internal workforce development 
approach. We have a team dedicated to Enterprise Workforce Planning that has been working closely 
with workgroups across the agency to develop and implement a competency-based framework. Each 
job description will ultimately be tied to a set of behavioral, technical and leadership competencies. This 
approach will provide a baseline for creating job descriptions, recruiting and interviewing candidates 
and assessing training needs. The EWP have also developed a set of web-based tools so that employees 
can easily locate resources to strengthen specific competencies and identify potential career pathways.  

We have created a cross-enterprise working group to support the implementation of the competency 
model and associated training and leadership development programs.  

Community Partnering and Engagement Activities   

The SFPUC is committed to building long-term relationships with our stakeholders and community 
members.  Values around “being a good neighbor” and community benefits have been integrated 
throughout all levels of the Agency – from our mission and governing policies (noted earlier) to how we 
conduct our business regarding budget decisions, land use, and community investments. Executive 
leadership, staff, and external stakeholders all play a role in shaping and refining our approach to 
community partnering and engagement, which spans the International Association of Public 
Participation’s Spectrum of Public Participation: from informing, to consulting, to involving, to 
collaborating, and finally to empowering. These are some of SFPUC’s activities in the Community 
Partnering and Engagement area:  

Inform: Cutting Edge Public Education  

The SFPUC has a pro-active, engaging, multi-media approach to keeping the public informed about our 
work. We look for unconventional ways to engage the public and to make our invisible systems visible. 
For example, to get people on board with 10% water conservation goals, we launched a public 
education campaign to show that water conservation is smart and sexy, with taglines like “When 
showering, make it a quickie.”  We also enlisted the help of some of our summer interns to help us 
create a rap about our sewer system, which has over 25,000 views on YouTube.  

Consult: Equitable Engagement Guidelines