472 

 

 

Identify customer complaint trends  

 

Implement “Comment Cards” concept across division  

 

Increase electronic outreach to citizens  

EUM attribute: Operational Optimization  

 

Evaluate and optimize pumping control scenarios for pumpback system  

 

Develop a Chemical Cost Matrix for use in identifying savings  

 

Develop an Electrical Cost Matrix to identify opportunities to reduce energy demand  

Initiatives and programs implemented through previous years’ EUM action plans include:  

 

Created the Apprentice Program in water and wastewater treatment  

 

Significantly expanded recruiting program  

 

Expanded SCADA communications planning  

 

Expanded emergency operations exercises and preparedness  

 

Initiated quarterly Operational Workshops focused on operational resiliency  

 

Implemented an electrical equipment assessment program  

 

Initiated a Technology Master Plan to be integrated into the structure of the integrated water 
and wastewater master plans  

As part of our ongoing efforts to position ourselves as a Utility of the Future, Scottsdale Water launched 
an operations optimization project in 2010 to implement a new organizational structure, business 
processes and technology to bring all utility operations together under one holistic system of operation.  

The efforts resulted in the creation of Scottsdale’s Optimization Program. The three main goals of the 
program are to:  

 

Effectively monitor, evaluate and coordinate the various utility operating systems.  

 

Maximize system effectiveness through efficient cost saving operations.  

 

Enhance water and wastewater service reliability.  

Scottsdale Water took a business approach to optimizing our systems and adopted Lean principles to 
map out organizational and business processes to eliminate redundancy and highlight areas to 
streamline. Twenty-seven separate processes were mapped and evaluated to improve the business of 
producing, delivering, collecting and treating water and wastewater. Technology components were 
identified to aid in data compilation and accessibility, further enhancing overall utility operations. These 
early efforts helped Scottsdale begin to identify and eliminate departmental silos and move forward 
with a more collaborative approach toward operations.  

A key component of the Optimization Program was its integration with the city’s water resources 
management into the daily operating process. Scottsdale Water has a long history of thinking and acting 
strategically with our water resources. Prior to the mid 1980s, Scottsdale relied entirely on groundwater 
for its water supply. Today, about 90 percent of our drinking water comes from two renewable surface 
water sources: the Central Arizona Project, which delivers water from the Colorado River, and the Salt 
River Project, which brings water from the Salt and Verde rivers and watershed.